27 Sep

Blog 4

Good morning, friends. Sorry I posted so late. It has been a hectic week. Wednesday through Friday, I worked in my studio. I got a lot done. My ejection seat has the base and sides all glued up and stands on its own now. I am currently sifting through my junk collection looking for details that I can use once it is painted.

I had an order of Legos show up Friday to finish my gun for the MaMoPCA show on the seventh floor. That goes up October third. Pieces are starting to come in. Contact Joe Leroux or myself if you want in. Hopefully, my student loan will pay out this week and I can begin ordering Legos for a life-size missile that I have been working on. I need approximately eight hundred bricks to build it.

On October 17th, I will be conducting a performance at the Lab space in the Lofts. It will be “Human Battleship.” I was shooting for a bit later to no avail. I have since ramped up my efforts to full power. There are walls to be built which I began cutting lumber for this past weekend. I have completed two game piece objects and have began to test paint and cleanup for the concrete floor. My partner, Angie has been scouring resale shops for gray sweat suits. I hope I get good documentation as this is pretty labor intensive for a thirty to fifty minute performance. It will be a great time though! I still need eight more players so please email me if you can participate.

Friday, My family and I went to Appleton to see Aris Georgiades’ show and listen to his lecture. It was a great time. His work is one of the reasons I wanted to come to Madison in the first place. I could not believe his C.V. The Art Director spent eight minutes just hitting the “highlights” of Aris’ resume! His slide show was very enjoyable illustrating not just the professional studio and installation shots, but also great documentary images of work in process and aged shots. Angie was unable to stay for the lecture as our two-year old, Reyah wanted to give her own lecture in the auditorium.

07 FJ Cruiser

Sunday, I spent about three hours filming shots that I need for a performance piece in my non-static class. I have some previous filming experience from my first college and was reminded quickly as to the intricacies of directing children on a set! It was pretty entertaining. We would set up a shot and call “action” then one of the kids would walk in front of the camera or toss a toy that lands in the shot. We had six children and one dog on each set. I need to check close on my daily as I think that one clip as a black lab tail flicking into the bottom of the screen. I lost my cell phone on Sunday while the kids were playing at a pumpkin patch. When Angie returned, she informed me that it had been charging in my truck all day. The video camera was dead and I plugged it in to the outlet in our Landcruiser and turned on the AC power. The camera turned on for about seven seconds then died. My truck’s battery was dead now too. 2 dead batteries! I caught Ang and her sister before they left to the shoot location so that they could jump the truck. Our oldest daughter, Asyntha came up from Missouri for the weekend to visit and help. We unloaded the props and equipment at our first location and set up for our first scene. My daughter left in the Landcruiser to practice her driving skills with her aunt. As we cued the camera for the first scene, it was dead again. Ugh! Angie ran after the truck but could not catch them. We decided to play until they returned. My camera was not taking charge on the truck circuit so every shot was made tethered to the outlet in the back of the truck.

I was working with Dale last week on another video that I am using for a projection in a group piece. It will end up in the Seventh Floor Gallery next month. It is a war projection. I have no idea if the piece will be successful. It is different from how I usually work. We will see. 🙂

Friday, My family and I went to Appleton to see Aris Georgiades’ show and listen to his lecture. It was a great time. His work is one of the reasons I wanted to come to Madison in the first place. I could not believe his C.V. The Art Director spent eight minutes just hitting the “highlights” of Aris’ resume! His slide show was very enjoyable illustrating not just the professional studio and installation shots, but also great documentary images of work in process and aged shots. Angie was unable to stay for the lecture as our two-year old, Reyah wanted to give her own lecture in the auditorium.

As I went to pick up wood at the lumberyard, Saturday, my mom sent a message asking if I could build a new dog house for our family dog, Georgie. I told her no problem. I was getting kind of bored this weekend and needed some more blood sweat and tears to top it off. It was my own fault. I could have talked her into just repairing the roof and patching a couple of corners or even building a copy of her old house. Instead, My daughter and I designed a modern piece of canine architecture. This seemed like a good idea Saturday evening. By three Sunday, as I was removing a roof joist for the fourth time, I began to question the idea of claiming that I had permanent nerve damage in my right arm and would never be able to lift a saw again. By six in the evening my nephew was finishing insulating inside the house and we got the roof on. I have to admit, it is a pretty pimp doggy-domicile. It has an angled roof cantilevering into a porch with a dormer projecting from the opposite angle with a working window vent for the summer time. We sided some of the walls with tounge-and-groove recycled from the old dog house. I wanted to keep some of the original smell as she freaked out the last time she had a brand new house. I also reused her front door to keep it familiar.

vertsciss

emons airplane

Now, the original plan for the weekend was to drive to my hometown to pick up stuff to bring back to Madison. So, after a four hour drive early Saturday morning, a one and a half hour wait at a shopping mall for my daughter, a three hour tour in the lumber yard, an hour trip to haul lumber twelve miles (don’t ask), meeting with my in-laws to unload stuff out of their car, getting them a hotel, making it to the bar for pizza and the Cardinals game, getting up early to track down tools to build a dog house, surviving the video ordeal, and pre-cutting wood for the battleship piece, we finally began loading the truck for our trek back north. We actually loaded up a sculpture that I had been working on this summer to bring to the studio as well as my welding table. So, as I was writing this blog, We had the interior of the Landcruiser stacked to the gills with stuff, gifts, more stuff, a baby somewhere in the backseat. The trailer was in tow with another two thousand pounds of art stuff. We were being blown all over interstate 51 as we tooled along at sixty miles per hour watching the lightning and checking updates for the tornado watches issued earlier in the evening. I bet I rest very well tonight. Thanks for reading! Log in next week for more adventures of The man that could build stuff.

0 Responses to 27 Sep

  1. Sandy-
    My weekend was screwed, but it seems yours was a little more fuct then mine. I can only hope that all of your materials are north, and that traveling will cease to happen till the end of November.
    “Non static Class,” what the hell is that? It sounds cool. If you are working with Dale, who seems to know his shit, there should be some sweet work coming to the audience eyes. There is so much that I do not know such as “non static class”, and want to. However, with the past weekends ordeals you endured, it seems you have everything under control now. The dog house was a good exercise for you, it eased you gently back to being the “guy” who builds things. So what is next after the missile? Are you going to continue with the military theme? I look forward to seeing future pieces pertaining to your experiences in the Air Force. You have so many stories to tell, and creating it in 3-D is the only exercise to explain it. See you later. Brian

  2. Sandy! What an entertaining experience to read your blog this week. I have to say, I felt a little exhausted by the end of it. I am impressed with how relaxed you seemed to be with all the coming and going, all the building and delivering. While you were telling your adventure I kept trying to keep track of your whereabouts – I can’t say I could really figure all of it out. The story was good though.

    Your studio work sounds like it is going well. I’m glad that I had a chance to check out your space and a few of your projects prior to reading your posting. Do you usually work on so many different projects at once? Do you ever feel scattered or does it work well to have your mind working on several different problems and approaches? I was lovely to hear how your family was all tied into your different projects as well. I’ve wondered about some of the members in our class who have children and more family around. It sounds like it all shifts and moves together. It also seems like it heavily impacts your work – well, how could it not?

    I would like to know more about the Attacker/Defender illustration you put in your posting. Is this a sketch for a sculpture piece you are considering? Originally I thought the beautiful little drawing had something to do with the doghouse but I can’t quite make it fit.

    By the way, the doghouse sounds excellent. I would love to have a cozy enclosure like that! It sounds much warmer and homier than my apartment right now.

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sandberg creative        |        springfield, il        |        (608) 658-5103

sandberg creative        |        springfield, il        |        (608) 658-5103

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